TALKING ABOUT EDUCATION

DR HILARY JONES & WENDY SHILLAM TALK ABOUT EDUCATION

The other day I shared the floor with Dr. Hilary Jones,  GP, TV Presenter and Medical Broadcaster at the PRCA Education Group. 

EDUCATION AND NUTRITION

We all think we know a lot about nutrition.  But there are loads of myths out there.  How many of us monitor our fat or sugar consumption? Yet many studies now suggest that we may do better to increase our lean protein and fruit and vegetable consumption rather than obsess about fats and sugars.  And a recent study funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, has shown that salt consumption has a far bigger effect on health than the number of sugary drinks we take.  I wonder whether that is related to the salt content of convenience foods and processed meat products, rather than the salt we add to home cooked foods.

Dr Jones and I agreed on many issues.  It may seem like boring advice, but a healthy diet is a balanced diet. In order that the population understands how important a balanced diet is, we need more education in schools and more education for adults who have missed out.

I proposed a new curriculum that should include the following:

  • Food safety – including how to read food labels
  • Sustainability – how to eat for the planet and for our health
  • Metabolism – the relationship between calories, exercise and weight gain or loss
  • Balance – the nutritional content of a diet for different age groups
  • Culture – how different food cultures and commensal eating is important for our social, mental and  physical health.

In my practice this is part of the learning that benefits my clients.  Obesity costs the NHS £10billion/year. Treatment for diabetes alone in 2015 was 10% of the entire NHS budget. (Source, Diabetes UK)  But obesity costs the individual more.  A recent study showed that suboptimal dietary patterns are now responsible for more deaths worldwide than any other risk, including tobacco smoking (Afshin et al, 2019).  So, it makes sense for all of us to learn what a healthy diet is, and stick to it.

Old-fashioned domestic science is now outmoded, but it is learning to purchase good food and cook it simply that is something from which we might all befit.

Wendy would be happy to give a talk* for your group as part of her work for Say Tomato, a social enterprise.  Topics inlcude:

  • Diet Myths – Don’t let misinformation stand in the way of a healthy diet
  • Tread Lightly – sustainable eating – how to lose weight and reduce your carbon footprint.

*Free within the London tfl Oyster Card zone.

PROTEIN 10 MEAT FACTS

UNRAVELLING THE CONTROVERSY

Debate has been raging for weeks now about whether we should be eating meat, whether it is good for us or whether becoming vegan might be better for the planet. 

The amount of protein in different (generally 100g) portions of food. Source: https://www.bbc.com/food

Debate has been raging for weeks now about whether we should be eating meat, whether it is good for us or whether becoming vegan might be better for the planet.  There is a lot of rather biased, hysterical and misleading information going the rounds.  This article will, I hope, help to give you the information you require to make your own decision.

1. The need

We all need protein and the amino acids that they are composed of to sustain life.  Protein, along with carbohydrates and fats are the three  major nutrients in iur diet, often termed macro-nutrients.  Unlike carbohydrates and fats, our bodies are not adept at storing reserves of protein.  That means that if you ever go short on protein, the body may break down skeletal muscle in order to keep vital organs and body processes going.  We need protein to build strength, make and renew cells, strengthen immunity and fight diseases like cancer.

2. Animal or vegetable?

The constituents of proteins, whether derived from an animal or vegetable sources, are the same. During digestion all protein is broken down into amino acids which the body re-builts into new strings of chemicals.  These protein strands may for example, become DNA, help build bones, or might become a hormone like insulin.   The thing that all body builders know is that protein is essential for building muscle.  But while they are focused on building pecs, ‘ceps and quads the really crucial protein goes first into building and maintaining our organs.  The heart is a muscle and composed of proteins very similar to a six-pack.

Animal and vegetable proteins can be equally beneficial, though are not always equally digestible, or available in the correct mix.  Meat is not as good as eggs and milk which have been found to contain some of the most beneficial and easily digestible mixes of amino acids.  All foods can be scored depending on their amino acid content and their digestibility. Here are some typical values:

Source: Protein Digestibility–Corrected Amino Acid Score. (Schaafsma, 2000)

Proteins with higher than 100% values can be used in combination with lower protein value foods.  A classic example of this is the combination of milk and bread. The high lysine content of milk can compensate for the lower concentration in the wheat. Vegetarians can take advantage of this is formulating a healthy diet.

3. How much do we need?

The world health organisation has been gathering research on protein consumption since WWII.  Their advice is that we need about 0.8g/day of pure protein for every kilo of body weight. Consult the info-graphic at the top of this article to understand how many grammes of pure protein in different foods.

It is best to eat protein at every meal. If you are still growing muscle and bone (under 25), sick, or over 50, many nutritionists now suggest that eating nearer 1g/kg/day may be beneficial.   Some nations, like Norway and Australia recommend that protein be considered as a percentage of the diet, ranging from 10-20%. That boils down to an average protein requirement for a man or woman of normal weight of three good meals a day, each containing a minimum of 15-20g pure protein.

If you eat meat, this quantity is pretty easy to achieve.  In fact, in countries like the USA, protein consumption is often far higher than this. Higher consumption is safe, though too much of any food can make us fat. An unbalanced diet is good for no-one.

However, it is far more difficult to achieve good levels of protein from plant foods.  For example, 100g lean braising beef contains more than three times the quantity of protein compared to the same weight of cooked lentils (20g:6g).  Vegetables like broccoli, mushrooms or avocado, though they contribute a little protein, should not be considered a main meal source. Half an avocado contains only 2g of protein.

4.Welfare protein

Some people have an ethical objection to eating living things.  But to say that red meat should be left uneaten, may be step too far.  If you do decide to eat red meat remember that it isn’t the most efficeint, or lean source of protein.  Eggs and milk offer the highest levels and chicken, fish, soy and legumes all offer a leaner meal. But red meat is one very good source of heme iron, which is easily absorbed.  Eggs, chicken, fish and pulses also contain good quantities of readily available iron. Eating vegetable iron with vitamin C can improve the uptake of this non-heme iron, but we’re still not sure to what extent.

Anyone contemplating giving up all animal products all together should seriously consider the danger of a compromised nutrition. A vegan diet can not only reduce the protein we eat, but reduce our stocks of Iodine, Vitamin B12, Calcium, Iron and Vitamin D.   It isn’t impossible, but it does require very careful menu planning, or a shedload of artificial supplements.  Be very careful with the young, the elderly, the pregnant or the sick, who have less resilient to malnutrition.  The vegan society recommends that vegans take a B12 supplement.

5. Processed protein

There is now little doubt that processed protein of any kind is bad for us. Recent studies have linked processed meat to cancer and cardiovascular disease.  I would advise a very moderate intake of processed meats like sausages, bacon and jerky.  These contain nitrates and nitrites (bio-active salts) that can interfere with our metabolism. Processed meats often have a higher fat and sugar content than unprocessed meat or leaner proteins. Careful scrutiny of the nutrition label is essential for processed foods of all kinds and processed meat products in particular – even those bearing an organic, low calorie or similarly ‘healthy’ label.

6. Lean protein

The high fat content in beef and pork make them less beneficial than pulses, soy, milk or fish. If you want to lose weight, restrict yourself to lean proteins, by which I mean chicken, fish, whole milk, soy and legumes.  The protein in cheese, nuts and meat is high quality, but can add weight.  On the other hand, the fats in full milk, while being flavoursome and satisfying, seem to react well in our digestion and not to cause the cardiac harm that other saturated fats are known for.  In fact, several recent epidemiological studies show evidence that consumption of full fat milk and yoghurts reduce the risk of cardiovascular and heart disease (Dehghan et al., 2018).

7. Organic Protein

Protein is a very active substance.  It is composed of highly reactive atoms like hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen molecules strung together with carbon, in different configurations.  The long strings are folded and twisted into complex forms. They are held together by electro-chemical bonds, by the strong attractions of minerals, like selenium, manganese, zinc or iron.  Alternatively, the bonds may be electrostatic like the forces that cause hydrogen atoms to shoot about within protein structures, or to be powered by the weak and transient Van der Waals forces between atoms.  The upshot of all this complexity is that under the scrutiny of an electron microscope proteins seem to dance and sway.  They form portals, opening and closing to let substances into and out the cells; they form complex runs, like rails, along which other proteins progress like trains; they form claws that can capture and engulf viruses. Miraculously, within every cell in the body, proteins form and re-form again and again to make the perfectly beautiful double helix structure of DNA, creating a blueprint for cell division, regrowth and, of course, reproduction.

Hormones, pesticides and fertilizers, most of which are designed to interfere with the protein structure of microbes, weeds and pests can also interfere with human functions.  The closer the food is to human structure ie mammalian meat, the more important this becomes.
Thus organic meat, where such contamination has been reduced to the bare minimum makes perfect sense.  When you eat a highly dosed foodstuff you may be unwittingly ingesting highly active chemicals and additives than come along for the ride.
For example some pesticides are so chemically similar to nerve gas that they are stringently controlled in most western countries – but residues exist in everything we eat.  Within proteins these contaminants can get a free ride, causing havoc.  And because we are genetically so similar to other mammals there are dangers of ingesting artificial hormones from mammalian meat, as well as contracting diseases that can jump species like BSE.

If you live in a polluted city, where you are breathing in other bio-active chemicals, then eating organic may be even more important.

8. Sustainable protein – eating grass fed

Some meat production causes high levels of greenhouse gas emissions.  In particular ruminants like cattle emit large quantities of methane, which is a very dangerous greenhouse gas, hundreds of times more potent than CO2.   If the animal is fed on cereal that has been boosted with artificial fertilizers, then the emissions can be thirty times higher than the emissions from producing the same weight of vegetables or fruits (Rose, 2019).  That is why we are all being advised to eat less meat and save the planet.  But no reputable scientific evidence suggests that there is an immediate imperative for us to give up meat eating all together.

A sustainable diet is one that uses the least resources to deliver the most nutrition, in perpetuity.  And while some systems can produce high yields in the short term, many farmers are now saying that it is organic farming that maintains good soil composition and can thus secure high yields and maximum nutrition in the long term.
Land which cannot be used for arable crops lends itself to grassland and grass-fed livestock farming.  Some studies have shown that grass-fed livestock can actually contribute to reducing greenhouse emissions and improve the nutritonal quality of the meat.

The diagram below compares non-organic, non-grass fed emissions.

Source: Baker,(2018).

Imported meat will inevitably have clocked up a large number of food-miles, using energy to deliver it.  Out of season products grown in a greenhouse may have required artificial lighting, heating and watering, all increasing the energy used to produce them and thus decreasing their sustainability.  That is why GYO or buying in-season, direct from the farmer is recommended as the best of all possible worlds.

10. So what?

In deciding where you will draw your own lines, I would advise thinking about three things.

  • First and foremost is the need to ensure that you and your family are eating a healthy diet. That means don’t stint on protein.
  • Secondly, ensure that your diet contains crops that are safe for you and for the environment. I’d advice seeking the most local, freshest and least processed food you can afford.  Go for good quality, lean protein.
  • Thirdly, I would advise considering the entire food chain and production values in the food you buy and where you shop.

It is no good berating a friend for eating meat one day a week, if they walk to a local butcher, buy grass fed organic and use every scrap, while you take the Ranger Rover to buy an intensively farmed, imported, factory produced, meat substitute.  Have a little understanding for your fellows along the way.  The debate has become quite nasty, and that’s not good for any of us.

Further reading:

Look at food labels.  They tell you a lot about what you are buying.

Baker, Katherine, (2018) Counting Calories? Count Your Carbon, Too ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH, FOOD POLICY AND OBESITY Columbia Mailman School of Public Health  Jun. 2018 https://www.mailman.columbia.edu/public-health-now/news/counting-calories-count-your-carbon-too

Go Grass-Fed! The Benefits of Buying Pasture-Raised Meats from Honest Weight

https://www.honestweight.coop/page/honest-weight-fresh-news-287/news/go-grass-fed-the-benefits-of-buying-pasture-raised-meats-from-honest-weight-40.html

Links to the science:

British Nutrition Foundation (2016) Nutritional Requirements website. https://www.nutrition.org.uk/attachments/article/234/Nutrition%20Requirements_Revised%20Oct%202016.pdf  Note that BDA recommend a slightly lower level of Protein than other international sources.

Cook and Reddy, (2001). Effect of ascorbic acid intake on nonheme-iron absorption from a complete diet. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 2001;73:93–8. https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/73/1/93/4729737

Dehghan, Mente, Rangarajan et al., (2018) Association of dairy intake with cardiovascular disease and mortality in 21 countries from five continents (PURE): a prospective cohort study. The Lancet Volume 392, issue 10161, p2288-2297, November 24, 2018

Heller, Willits-Smith, Meyer  et al., (2018) Greenhouse gas emissions and energy use associ-ated with production of individual self-selected U.S. diets. Environmental Research letters Online. 2018;13:044004.

https://scholar.google.com/scholar_lookup?title=Greenhouse%20gas%20emissions%20and%20energy%20use%20associated%20with%20production%20of%20individual%20self-selected%20U.S.%20diets&author=MC%20Heller&publication_year=2018

Rose, Heller, & Roberto (2019) Position of the Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior(sic): The Importance of Including Environmental Sustainability in Dietary Guidance. Journal of Nutritional Education and Behavior 2019; 51:3,15.

https://www.jneb.org/article/S1499-4046(18)30673-0/pdf

Schaafsma, (2000) Protein Digestibility–Corrected Amino Acid Score

WHO (2007) Protein and amino acid requirements in human nutrition Report of a joint FAO/WHO/UNU expert consultation (WHO Technical Report Series 935) https://www.who.int/nutrition/publications/nutrientrequirements/WHO_TRS_935/en/

SAY TOMATO RADIO

LISTEN TO THE PODCASTS

Welcome to the new podcast page.  Say Tomato Radio will, I hope, become a place of sanity and refuge for dieters everywhere.  These are short, ten minute, podcasts that will gradually introduce listeners to the secrets of healthy dieting.   This is an exercise in consciousness raising. One of the most effective ways of dieting is to bring eating into our conscious mind. So here is an opportunity to simply think about what you eat and why you eat.  Each broadcast provides tips and a bit of support. The advice I give is always backed-up by scientific evidence.  I’m dedicated to busting those diet myths that can stand in the way of success.

Do comment and question.  Tell me what you like and what you’d like to hear more about.  Ask me a question and I’ll try and answer you directly, and (with your permission) put your question onto the podcast. And if you want to know anything about the studies I use to support the advice, I’ll gladly share further details.

Podcast No. 1 Yes We Can!

Transcript

Hi! Welcome to Say Tomato! The podcast about sustainable diets, ethical food, living lightly on the planet and tomatoes.

My mantra is that it’s never too late to get healthy, so whatever your age, your current state of health, or your weight – take heart! Sit back and enjoy the talk.

In the old days I always dreaded January, because it meant that I would have to go on yet another diet. All over again I’d be forced to get to grips with the weight I’d gained over the previous year.  Then, when I reached fifty, I decided I’d let it slip.  I’d probably read somewhere that once you get past the menopause weight gain is inevitable or that weight loss becomes too hard.

I’m here to tell you that was wrong.  Fortunately, I realised, just in time and it’s that realisation – over ten years ago now – that triggered my retraining as a nutritionist. I worked my way through university, did the research and then eventually started helping other women like me to lose weight and retain their health, vitality and yes – self esteem!

But being overweight isn’t just about how you look – it’s about how you feel.

Let’s look at a few facts:

Firstly there is no evidence to show that it gets harder to lose weight as we grow older.  In fact some studies show that after the age of fifty it gets a bit easier.  But these studies should be treated with caution, healthy weight loss means loss of fat mass. However, as we get older our muscles tend naturally to decline and this can result in unhealthy weight loss. A loss of muscle mass is called sarcopenia and is associated with some serious medical issues, not least frailty.

The trick of weight loss for the over-fifties is to lose the fat and keep or even increase muscle mass.  And the good news is that many studies are now showing that we can lose weight and increase muscle mass well into old age.  And I’m talking way beyond fifty, into our 80s, 90’s and beyond.  With the correct nutrition it seems to be something we can always improve on.

But dieting is too hard,” I hear you say.  And it is true that weight loss – the type that is sustainable and maintainable – does require most of us to turn over a new leaf. To be effective we need to discover how to eat healthily for our current age and body type. But millions of people do it every year.  The reason why dieting has got such a bad name is that millions more try and don’t succeed.  The main reasons they don’t succeed is because their reducing diet is unbalanced and unrelated to a long term eating strategy.

Unbalanced diets
Our bodies are miraculous.  Every day, every single human cell we possess monitors the nutrition we provide it and sends out signals if something is wrong.

We receive immediate taste and digestive messages when food hits the palette or is passed through the stomach and into the intestines.

Then there are intermediate term hormonal signals and cellular signals that turn off fat burning, or turn on muscle building, depending on what type of nutrients are swilling through the bloodstream.

Finally there are long term and learned signals that come to the sophisticated cognitive part of our brain that works on the basis of information from the rest of the body and a learned response.   So even if you’ve eaten enough calories on any particular day, your body may still send you food cravings to account for a specific nutrient that might have been missing from your diet. A well formulated diet will contain all the nutrients that the body needs, and thus reduce the  chances of cravings.

Long term eating strategies
The other reason why diets don’t work is because they don’t re-educate the body.  For example diets that rely on manufactured meal replacements can be pretty easy to follow and can produce early weight loss.  But when you go back to eating normally you won’t have re-learned any useful eating strategies and the likelihood is that you’ll pile the weight back on.

So a good diet must be well balanced and must help the dieter to learn about how their body responds to different foods.  A good diet will actually change your body composition to such an extent that it’ll change your tastes.  Sugar and fat cravings will reduce and you’ll find yourself wanting fresh vegetables, salads or a nice piece of lean fish instead.

Taking control
But in order to get to that point you need to take back control of your eating.  In my clinic I will give a new client eating plans.  The every time they come they learn a little more about how to eat a balanced and healthy diet.  Over time the diet sheets are cast aside as the client themselves takes back complete control of their eating.  This isn’t about counting calories or even food points.  It’s about really understanding what constitutes a balanced and healthy diet for the individual.  We are all different.

I hope that these podcasts will give you confidence to change your eating habits and return to a healthier lifestyle.  The benefits are not simply measured in inches off the waist and fitting into a small dress size, though that’s quite a nice thing.  Obesity, defined as a body mass index of greater than 30kg per metre squared, is the most significant predictor of diabetes type 2.  Being fat is far more significant in diabetes that eating too much sugar, or eating too many carbohydrates.

In addition obesity is now recognised as a predictor of mortality, cardiac problems, joint failure, sleep apnoea, depression and even dementia.  And if the prospect of obesity shortening life doesn’t concern some people, then the prospect of enduring a longer period of sickness and frailty in old age, might tip the scales for others.

Losing weight isn’t just about living longer, it’s about living the rest of your life more actively, more comfortably and more healthily.

The secret to losing weight, once you know that it certainly is possible and that it’s the healthy option, is about making the decision and taking back conscious control of your eating.  President Obama in his famous Chicago election address said this,

“I am asking you to believe. Not in my ability to bring about change — but in yours…”

That’s what I’m asking my clients to do.  To believe in themselves, to believe in their own ability to manage weight loss and then the maintenance that comes after.

Listen each month to a new podcast that will examine a different aspect of losing weight.  Next month I’ll be asking the question, “What should I give up in order to lose weight?”  You might be rather surprised by the answer.  And if you can’t wait that long, then go to my website wendyshillam.co.uk and book a one-to-one consultation.   As Obama once memorably said, “Yes we can”.

Thanks to all our contributors, and to iCent for their fabulous music. This is wendy Shillam saying, thanks for listening.

LONDON’S HIDDEN RIVERS BY MOONLIGHT – THE WESTBOURNE AND HYDE PARK

WALK DETAILS  MONDAY 18TH FEBRUARY  2019 7.50PM

We follow the course of the Westbourne River and its culverted tributaries through  Hyde Park and Knightsbridge towards the river.  On the way I’ll explain a bit about the way the river has been used to feed wells for the monks of Westminster Abbey, by Queen Caroline to provide fountains and ornamental lakes to adorn the gardens of Kensington Place, and latterly to manage drainage and run-off from London’s growing suburbs. There will be plenty of time to chat and get to know your fellow walkers.

In order to maintain a reasonable start time, this walk takes place on the day before the full moon, which this month will be a supermoon – exceptionally large and bright.

 

Photo-opportunities:  The highpoint will be moonrise from the Serpentine Bridge.   Night time in the park is also exciting for wildlife watching.  The park boasts several species of bats, little owls, and we might come across red foxes and, if the adventures of Peter Pan are to be believed, faeries.

Meeting Point:  Lancaster Gate Tube Station at 7.50 for a prompt 8.00pm start.

Finish Point: The walk will take approximately 2 hours, ending at Chelsea Bridge with an option to cross the Thames (more lovely photo opportunities) to have a coffee at a late night pop-up café in Chelsea Bridge Wharf.

Requirements:  Bring walking shoes, warm clothes and a torch.  This walk is dog and wheelchair friendly, though does involve some low-lit stretches in the park. Dogs and their owners may have to sit outside the cafe at the end of the walk.

Walk leader:  Wendy Shillam, a trained walk leader, will lead the walk

Tickets: Once checked and paid for you will receive an emailed receipt that is your ticket for the event.  Please keep it safe.

Image:  Arthur Rackham’s illustrations for the 1905 edition of Peter Pan by J M Barrie, Courtesy Kensington and Chelsea Public Library

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Making New Year’s Resolutions

FIVE WAYS TO MAKE YOUR WEIGHT-LOSS RESOLUTION SUCCESSFUL

A well-structured New Year’s resolution should be easy to remember, simple to monitor and achievable.  If your resolution includes weight loss, here are some touch-stones.

  1. Keep it simple
    Make your new year’s resolution something you can say in a sentence. “I resolve to lose that extra weight, forever!”  Or turn it into a motto, “A moment on the lips, a lifetime on the hips.”
  2. Make it measurable
    While a motto or a short sentence is fine for explaining your decision to others, a quantifiable resolution is more likely to succeed. Who, how, by how much, when, and why all require an answer.  I’m going on a diet! is a typical short-term resolution. A better long-term resolution might be,
    I’m going to change my diet today, so that I lose X kg in six months, so that I can get into my favourite dress, reduce my carbon footprint and maintain a strategy that will ensure that the weight never returns.
    It’s the maintenance part that’s the real challenge. It is so often forgotten in the rush to get slim, yet it should be at the top of your agenda even when you embark on a diet.
  3. Make it sustainable
    Studies show that we aren’t very good at making change simply for our own benefit. That’s one of the reasons why I recommend manoeuvring your diet in a more sustainable direction. If you are ever tempted by over processed, packaged gunk, remember that type of eating is as bad for the environment as it is for you. Your aim should be to tread lightly on the planet, in all senses of the word.  Don’t lose weight for your own benefit, do it for your grandchildren.
  4. Tell your friends
    Don’t be embarrassed or shy about telling your friends, family and even business acquaintances that you’ve decided to diet. They can help you; they are your best allies. If you find that some people try to undermine your diet, challenge them. They may simply be hiding their own guilty eating secrets. You’ll find most of your friends will be wonderfully supportive and some may even welcome less consumption oriented socialising.
  5. Seek help
    It is very difficult to make changes alone. There’s loads of rubbish out there pedalled by unqualified and ill-informed people. Don’t believe what you read, even if it is written by a  doctor. Nutritionists aren’t doctors, and medical doctors aren’t taught nutrition (though some are knowledgeable).  Choose someone who is qualified and sympathetic. If you plan to pay someone to help you, make sure you engage a nutritionist registered with the Association for Nutrition which is the UK recognised registration body. Statistics show that people who seek help and support for their weight loss journey tend to lose more weight and keep it off.
    But above all remember that a resolution to lose weight is achievable.  Hundreds of people do it every year and benefit from the boost to health and vitality that weight loss can offer. Be assured, you can succeed.

There are some rather good resolutions here from Benenden Health that I helped formulate.

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JOIN US AT THE TOTAL ECLIPSE

WALK DETAILS  MONDAY 21st JANUARY 2019

A 4.00am (yes, I really do mean AM) start to observe the total lunar eclipse from Harrow Hill.

This is a short walk through Harrow on the Hill at the dead of night, to emerge on the hill in time to observe the full moon in eclipse. We’ll watch the eclipse and then find refuge in a local all-night cafe. Night bus N18 runs from Trafalgar Square to Harrow on The Hill Rail Station all through the night. Wear warm clothes, bring a flask of hot drinks and your camera.

Meeting Point: Harrow on the Hill Rail Station at 3.50AM (for a prompt 4.00am start)

This walk will take two hours, the entire section taking place in the dark. Bring walking shoes, warm clothes and a torch. We will finish at an all nigh cafe where members of the group can have a coffee or a sandwich.

This walk is dog and wheelchair friendly, though does involve some unlit stretches in the park and steep hills. Dogs and their owners may have to sit outside the cafe at the end of the walk.

Wendy Shillam, a trained walk leader, will lead the walk

Once checked and paid for you will receive an emailed receipt that is your ticket for the event.  Please keep it safe.

For night-walks please ensure you wear warm clothes, good shoes and come with a torch and a warm drink. We cannot guarantee that cafes will always be open, though we try to find a suitable stop-off point at the end of the walk.

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FREE DROP-IN SESSIONS

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MONTHLY FREE DROP-IN SESSIONS

If you’d like to meet Wendy and ask her any nutritional questions you are welcome to come along to the consulting room at Shiv Pharmacy, 70 Great Titchfield Street, London W1W 7QN.

On the Second Thursday in the month. 12.00 midday -2.00pm.  Starting Thursday January 10th 2019.  No booking required.

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I’m happy to answer confidential questions about weight-loss, balanced diet, what to eat and when it might be necessary to supplement your diet.

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These are free drop-in sessions so we can’t predict how much time each person may have.  You can also book a free no-obligation 15-20 minute telephone or email consultation via the website: wendyshillam.co.uk

New Year Talks and Call-in

Start the New Year with a resolution you mean to keep
CALL 020 7637 0057 
 EMAIL wendy@wendyshillam.co.uk

Please call me at any time during the first week of January  to receive help and advice with your New Year’s resolution.  Whether you want to lose weight, feel fitter, change your diet or cut out the bad stuff, I can help.  I’ll be open for free telephone consultations on New Year’s Day from 8.00am to 8.00pm, and throughout the week until Sunday 6th January.

Telephone callers will receive a free twenty minute consultation.  Please note I cannot solve your weight loss in one short session, but I hope I can point you in the right direction.  If you’d like to discuss coming to a consultation that’s fine.  But its equally fine if you just need some pointers.  I’m here to help.

TALKS

Busting Diet Myths 

DATE

Wednesday 2nd January

TIME

3.00PM

LOCATION

THE NUTRITION CLINIC, 122 GREAT TITCHFIELD STREET, W1W 6ST

“Diets don’t work!”,   “Over fifty is too old to diet?”,   “If you want to lose weight you must give up your favorite foods.”

I’m here to bust some of these myths and offer a little sanity to the diet debate. This free talk is followed by tea and nutritious cakes. 

[brando_blockquote brando_token_class=”brando_blockquote_1545402546-2-9″ blockquote_icon=”1″ brando_blockquote_heading=”Alison, aged 67, successful dieter”]In life you occasionally come across great opportunities.  When I met Wendy I found a kind, caring and very thoughtful lady. She considered my needs and knew just what to do.[/brando_blockquote][brando_button brando_token_class=”brando_button_1540656873-2-46″ button_style=”style1″ brando_button_preview_image=”style1″ button_type=”small” margin_setting=”1″ desktop_margin=”margin-one-bottom” ipad_margin=”sm-margin-one-bottom” mobile_margin=”xs-margin-one-bottom” button_text=”url:https%3A%2F%2Fwendyshillam.co.uk%2Funcategorized%2Fnewyeardrop-in%2F%23talksbooking|title:BOOK||”][brando_separator brando_token_class=”brando_sep_1545402418-2-8″ margin_setting=”1″ desktop_margin=”margin-one-bottom” ipad_margin=”sm-margin-one-bottom” mobile_margin=”xs-margin-one-bottom” brando_sep_bg_color=”#8c8a0e” brando_height=”2px”]
TREAD LIGHTLY! FRIDAY 4TH JANUARY 3.00PM

DATE

FRIDAY 4TH JANUARY 3.00PM

TIME

3.00PM

LOCATION

THE NUTRITION CLINIC, 122 GREAT TITCHFIELD STREET, LONDON W1W 6ST

In a recent survey five out of the top ten strategies for reducing climate change were food related. How will this affect you? The good news is that a healthy diet and sustainable eating go hand in hand. In this short talk I will demonstrate how we can save the planet and live more healthily. Followed by tea and nutritious cakes.

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PRCA education group event: Education and nutrition

DATE

WEDNESDAY 20th MARCH

TIME

6.00PM

LOCATION

MEMBERS ONLY WWW.PRCA.ORG.UK

Since long before Jamie’s School Dinners, educationalists have highlighted the key link between nutrition and cognitive ability.  We will explore the links that a good diet can have on achievement and wellbeing.
GUEST SPEAKERS

Dr Hilary Jones

GP, TV presenter, medical broadcaster and spokesperson for the School and Nursery Milk Alliance.

Wendy Shillam

MA, MSc, ANutr, RSPH, sustainable nutritionist, environmentalist and organic gardener.

Book a consultation today!

If you wish to lose weight or re-balance your eating you can book a fixed price double session.  For many people that is all that you will require.

Losing a lot of weight: If you need to lose weight. we’ll discuss that within the first session and I’ll offer you a new diet straight away.  One option is a supervised diet.  This will requires us to meet weekly at first for closer nutritional supervision.  Because it is a fast and efficient diet, it is limited to eight weeks.   But you will need to return for further paid consultations after that in most cases.

Other issues:

The fixed price double session is also very suitable for many other eating issues, for example those who simply want to re-balance their eating, who are experiencing symptoms that might be associated with diet, or who are concerned about managing diabetes type 2, high cholesterol or maintaining a healthy heart.

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Book a talk or a free New Year Call-in here

*Please complete all fields correctly

TURNER’S SUNSETS AND SUNRISES

WALK DETAILS  FRIDAY 23rd NOVEMBER 2018

Turner and The Thames at Richmond.
Experience the magic of a winter twilight along a stretch of the Thames beloved by the artist Turner, who lived nearby. This walk coincides with the enchanted illuminations at Syon House, viewed over the river.

Meeting Point: Kew Bridge Station 17.50 for 18.00 prompt start.

This walk will take two hours, the entire section taking place after sunset. Bring walking shoes, warm clothes and a torch. We will finish at a pub where members of the group can have a coffee or a soup.

This walk is dog and wheelchair friendly, though does involve some unlit stretches of the riverside walk. Dogs and their owners may have to sit on the outside chairs at the end of the walk.

Wendy Shillam, a trained walk leader, will lead the walk

Once checked and paid for you will receive an emailed receipt that is your ticket for the event.  Please keep it safe.

For night-walks please ensure you wear warm clothes, good shoes and come with a torch and a warm drink. We cannot guarantee that cafes will always be open, though we try to find a suitable stop-off point at the end of the walk.

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SUSTAINABLE DIETS

DETAILS

Thinking or going vegan?   Wondering whether your diet is sustainable? Confused by the conflicting information out there?

Let me help you.  I can provide you and a friend or partner a two hour workshop.  We’ll look at your diet now, your aspirations for a better lifestyle and make sure that any changes you make will reduce your carbon footprint, while increasing your health.

The good news is that a healthy diet is also a sustainable diet.  It’s not a one-size-fits-all.  It is about making stepwise improvements that will have you treading lightly in all senses of the word.

Please note this is not weight loss advice.

Makes an excellent gift for a couple.

I can tailor the session to include any issues that you and your partner particularly want to cover. For example:

  • Treading lightly on the planet – why is it important
  • Formulating a low carbon diet plan
  • Easy and nutritious cooking
  • Eating local and seasonal foods
  • Reducing packaging and kitchen waste
  • Healthy eating on the move
  • Sustainable protein sources
  • Nutritional balance

You’ll take home a diet planner and recipes.

2 hours, £185.00 for one or two people.

I can also provide a version of this session as a talk for your group or institute.

Follow-on consultation can be booked at 30 minutes £95.00, or 50 minutes £185.00, but are usually unnecessary.

MAINTENANCE CLUB SAY TOMATO!
You will not be eligible to join the maintenance club, or take advantage of ongoing telephone support, but you may still attend some of the open events for a small fee.

[brando_content_block brando_block_premade_style=”block-22″ brando_block_preview_image=”block-22″ brando_token_class=”brando_content_block_1540649663-2-77″ brando_image=”5360″ brando_title=”SUSTAINABLE FOR YOU”]Eating this way isn’t simply good for the planet, its good for you too.[/brando_content_block]
[brando_content_block brando_block_premade_style=”block-22″ brando_block_preview_image=”block-22″ brando_token_class=”brando_content_block_1540562226-2-16″ brando_image=”5360″ brando_title=”Tread lightly”]Learn how to reduce your carbon footprint and how to tread lightly on the planet without ruining your diet.[/brando_content_block]
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ANY QUESTIONS?

ASK THEM BELOW – THANK YOU